artist statement

An important aspect of what I do is to strip away the superfluous features of subjects and convey their very essence without disrupting it to the point that it has no connection to the original.

In principle I do not agree with an ‘artist statement’. As a dyslexic, words are not my ideal method of communication, I prefer instead to let my work communicate my ideas rather than compromise the meaning with words that may not convey my true intent¬†for the work.¬† Nevertheless, I have reluctantly summarised some of my thoughts below.

My ideas come from a variety of sources but mostly the every day environment, be it nature, man-made objects or structures, and I often use people interacting with these forces. With stainless steel I try to convey simple lines and planes, whereas when working with stone my aim is to produce more bold, curved forms that have interesting negative space.

An important aspect of what I do is to strip away the superfluous features of subjects and convey their very essence without disrupting it to the point that it has no connection to the original. My intent in using this approach is to engage the curiosity of the viewer.

Working with stone is unpredictable. The stone has a way of its own and will not allow the sculptor to impose his/her will upon it entirely. In some places faults are revealed that cause the stone to fall away unexpectedly, in some places it is harder than others, or a buried vein of colour is revealed – this is both the joy and challenge of working in this medium. When I begin sculpting I have a vision in my head that I hope to achieve. This ideal vision is rarely achieved with stone due to the unpredictability of the medium itself.

When working in stainless steel I find the results are more predictable but the interaction of the light and the steel holds an unpredictable and exciting dimension that can’t be known until the piece is complete. Very different effects are seen in the same piece depending on whether it is in full daylight, or on a rainy day with raindrops sparkling and moving, or when the setting sun reflects off snow turning the bright steel a mellow amber or pink.